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Razorback Track and Field Programs Shine in Home Meet

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True to their historical success, the Razorback men’s and women’s track-and-field teams thrived in the Razorback Invitational on Jan. 26 and 27.

The women’s team took first place over the course of the two-day competition, dominating six top-10 teams, including Southeastern Conference opponents No. 3 Georgia and No. 9 LSU. The Razorbacks accumulated 118 points overall in the meet. The next-best score came from No. 4 University of South California with 82 points.

The distance runners for Arkansas put on a clinic for the Razorback fans in attendance.

In the mile, sophomore Taylor Werner won first place with a pace of 4:39.52, and sophomore Madeleine Reed followed closely behind with a time of 4:45.13.

In the 3,000-meter event, the Hogs took four of the top-10 spots to help the squad win the meet itself. Junior Devin Clark took the title, running a time of 9:21.20. Sophomore Carina Viljoen finished fourth running 9:30.85.

Many NCAA records were also broken by the Lady Hogs. Redshirt senior Taliyah Brooks established herself as the new NCAA leader in the pentathlon, an event that consists of five different track and field events. After two days, she accumulated a total of 4,395 points.

This came after an inspired performance in the 800-meter race. While Brooks placed fourth, she collapsed to the ground from exhaustion after expending all her energy into the race.

The events in the pentathlon consist of long jump, high jump, shot put, the 800-meter race and the 60-meter hurdles.

Pole Vaulter Lexi Jacobus also jumped her way to the top of the NCAA leaderboard. The 2016 Rio Olympian currently leads the nation with a vault mark of 15 feet-1.25 inches. Her twin sister Tori Hoggard is not far behind, currently sitting in third place on the NCAA Leaderboard.

Speed also helped the Hogs capture the title. In the 60-meter finals, sophomore Jada Baylark finished second with a time of 7.24.

The No. 7 men’s team also finished the meet with a strong overall performance, finishing eighth and accumulating 45 points.

The Razorbacks commanded the short-to-mid-range races, spearheaded by six-time All-American Obi Igbokwe ,who now holds the world-leading 400-meter time of 45.72. Igbokwe ran a solid first 200-meters of the race and continued to push the pace and pulled away from Texas A&M’s Mylik Kerley and Florida’s Kunle Fasasi within the last 100-meters to set the standard that is now the fastest time in the world.

Not far behind him was senior Kemar Mowatt with a blazing time of 46.83. Mowatt was also named to the 2018 Bowerman preseason watch list, which is given to the year’s best track and field student-athlete.

Redshirt junior and decathlon athlete Gab Moore had a solid start to the 2018 indoor season, scoring a personal best of 5,777 points in his two-day competition. He also earned a personal best in the 60-meter race with a time of 7.02.

The decathlon consists of four track events and six field events: the 100-meter sprint, 110-meter hurdles, 400-meter event, 1500-meter race, high jump, long jump, shot put, javelin throw, discus throw and pole vault.

Other Razorbacks helped out the team finish with a strong showing. In the mile race, redshirt Kyle Levermore clocked in a time of 4:08.31 to earn second place.

Sophomore Laquan Nairn earned second place in the long jump, jumping 25 feet, 10 inches.

The men’s team will take the week off, while the women’s team will travel to New York City Friday and Saturday to compete in the New York Armory.

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